Instagram

Saturday, May 23, 2020

What to Do If You and Your Family Are Quarantined at Home


Quarantined!

In June, 2009, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced a swine flu global pandemic---a new strain of flu that spread easily and widely between people, and an outbreak occurring in at least two regions of the world.

The press implied that WHO had proclaimed a major, world-wide disaster only days away. Mexico was virtually shut down as businesses, schools, and churches closed and people stayed home in droves---a self-imposed quarantine. Governments quarantined travelers from Mexico. When discovered to be less severe than outbreaks of usual flu strains---a "moderate" outbreak in WHO terminology, folks shook their heads and pooh-poohed the global pandemic.

However, this was the way the 1918-1919 Spanish Flu pandemic started: a summer outbreak with many people ill but few deaths, but autumn brought a second wave of the illness where at least 21 million people died worldwide.

Lesson: don't totally ignore doomsayers; plan for possible pandemics.

Whenever there is a pandemic, there will be isolations and quarantines for days or weeks. Prepare now.

Follow all preparations for natural disasters in other posts in this blog. But there are additional foci when planning for quarantine.

For example, the kinds of foods you store should include large amounts of easy-to-digest foods in case someone contracts the illness. The BRAT diet is one possibility: Bananas, Rice, Applesauce, Toast. Bananas are difficult to store, although they can be frozen in their skins and used in banana bread or blended beverages. Or you might try dehydrated banana chips or canned baby food. As for toast, unless you have a humongous freezer for storing many loaves of bread, you must have ingredients handy for making your own---and an alternative means of baking. Chicken soup is another good item.

Dehydration may need to be combated---as in the 2008 cholera epidemics in Africa. Water and juice are easiest to have on hand. Don't rely on sodas as they dehydrate rather than rehydrate a person.

Disposable plates, cups and tableware may be especially helpful, as are toilet paper, paper towels, and facial tissues. Plastic garbage bags of various sizes are useful, as well as a variety of sizes of baggies.

Make it possible to hang laundry in the sun---the first and best sanitizer. And, in the event of power outage, you may need a scrub board.

Water may need to be purified; use bleach or other disinfectant chemicals (chlorine, or medical-grade hydrogen peroxide). Or you can collect PET (a type of polyethylene) bottles, fill them with water and put them in the sun for five to six hours or for two cloudy days. Save the water in other safe containers so you can continually refill the PET bottles.

General medical supplies to have are a thermometer, medical gloves, and surgical-quality face masks. Ask your physician to help you safely and legally get a stock of prescription medications used by family members. Antibacterial wipes are also important.

These are just basics. In addition to gathering supplies, you would do well to research further to determine just what you need. But get to it---before it is too late.

For valuable information and tips on surviving natural disasters and emergency situations, please visit Emergency Preparation and Survival Tips Website today. You can't afford to wait. Don't be caught off guard. For Hiking and Camping Tips, please Hiking and Camping Tips.

By Tomira L. Rosser 


No comments:

Post a Comment

Featured Post

What to Do If You and Your Family Are Quarantined at Home

Quarantined! In June, 2009, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced a swine flu global pandemic---a new strain of flu that sprea...